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Friday, May 12, 2017

The Blitzkrieg Miniatures 222 Scout Car.

As many of you know, from various podcasts and articles on this site, I love wheeled vehicles. A lot! As an avid German player I own, and regularly use, several of Warlord's excellent resin 222 kit. While I am a fan of that kit, when I started working the vehicles for my Chinese (Battle For Shanghai) army, I wanted to add something a little different while still adding a 222 to my force. I decided to give Blitzkrieg Miniatures' resin model a try.





Here is the model right out of the package. You might notice that the MMG for the turret is missing. That is no fault of the kit. I somehow lost this small part between my mailbox and my desk. As you can see, every part of this kit is resin and including the missing barrel it is only 7 pieces.

This is a hallmark of Blitzkrieg kits. They are easy to assemble and get onto the tabletop to play with. While this might mean less variety if you buy multiples of their kits, it also means that I was able to clean the flash off this model and fully assemble it in less that 10 minutes.

What is truly remarkable is the level of detail that they are able to cram into a kit that is so easy to assemble. if you consider the turret/cupola for example, you will see that unlike many 222 kits, the rear of the turret is open and deep. This was a nice touch and really makes the model not seem like the solid block of resin that it is on the table.


Now the rest of the unpainted resin pictures in this article were taken before I cleaned additional flash and mold lines off the kit using a hobby knife. I used the "imperfect" pictures to show just how good these kits were when you opened their packaging. Sure there are additional resin bits and odd mold lines that have to be cleaned but they are few and far between. This kit, like other Blitzkrieg Miniatures I have built and painted in the past are exceptionally easy to build and are of a high quality. This is what the hull looked like when I opened mine up. Fantastic. It was a dream to get together!


Now, like all resin kits, you should carefully wash these models in warm water with dish washing soap to ensure that all old releasing agents and chemicals are gone. If you do not, you may face paint peeling issues down the track. I have been warned that Blitzkrieg models are susceptible to this problem but, maybe because I wash my models, I have yet to see it on any of my vehicles made my this company.

Here are pictures of the dry fit of my 222. It was so easy to assemble that when I slid the pieces together to trial the joins, the whole thing stayed together. Again, these are pictures taken prior to my cleaning the kit up.


Clearly I am a fan of this kit! If I had to nitpick something about this model that bothered me... it would be the wheels. While they are nicely detailed, the detail is a little on the shallow side which make the tires look a little two dimensional. That said, given the quality of this model, that is a VERY minor quibble that doesn't bother me at all.


Gamewise, in the second edition of Bolt Action, light auto cannons, like the one in the turret/cupola of this vehicle, are excellent all around weapons that are great against infantry and light vehicles alike. The multiple small templates they put out are a fantastic way of hitting multiple models within an infantry unit, even if it is spread out. This paired with a co-ax MMG, in the 222's turret makes this vehicle a great infantry hunter. That, combined with the fact that the 222 is a wheeled vehicle with recce, makes this armoured car a quick and nimble addition to many nation's arsenal.



Though, primarily found in German forces, they were so numerous that they were sold or given in great numbers to many minor Axis allies and to other nations like the Chinese. The 3rd Battalion in Nanking (Nationalist Chinese forces), for example, had an unknown number of the 221 and 222 scout cars in their ranks.



If you are looking for a well cast, easy to assemble 222 to add to your army, I would highly recommend the Blitzkrieg 222 kit.

Until next time...

Old Man Morin

1 comments:

Le Di Chang said...

From what I read all of the German armored vehicles in Chinese service still had their original tactical symbols (they just replaced the Balkan Cross with Nationalist emblem).

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